robin_anne_reid: (Treehouse)
2013-01-03 04:25 pm

MLA 2013 Session #60: Learning outomes in online second language environments

This presentation included powerpoints for all three, images, and, in the last presentation, a lot of graphs and statistical information. It's challenging to try to 'render' that in typed text (as opposed to a presentation that is delivered entirely verbally), and I'm not sure how good a job I did!

I don't teach languages, but I wanted to get notes from this session for my department's language faculty.

As I said earlier, rough notes, spellchecked and slightly edited, but probably less clear in some places due to my disciplinary ignorance.

60. Learning Outcomes in Online Second-Language Environments )
robin_anne_reid: (Treehouse)
2013-01-03 04:16 pm

MLA 2013 Session 22: Building Bridges, Expanding Access

Notes from MLA Sessions on or related to Digital Humanities at 2013 MLA.

Disclaimer: while I've done spellchecking and basic corrections, these are very raw. There are sentence fragments; there can be some slippage from first person to third person (I type while listening!) for the speaker, and there are some terms/words I did not catch or do not know how to spell. But I've learned from past situations, if I try to polish, these notes never get pubished.

So, they're rough.

Expanding Access session )
robin_anne_reid: (Default)
2013-01-01 11:38 am

About to head off to 2013 MLA but not presenting

My Dean started a College IT committee, for faculty in our college to develop projects that are disciplinary specific and informed by technology (of all sorts). So he's funding us to go to an appropriate professional conference, develop a pilot project, and then teach it. I have two ideas (will talk about a bit later!), but here's a list of the MLA conference sessions I'll be attending over the next few days. I plan to post notes from the sessions here as well!

cut because of length )
robin_anne_reid: (Default)
2012-08-18 08:15 pm

Finally, a new post!

Since the MLA conference, I've been doing a lot of other work, including administrative stuff (mostly, writing reports after being on committees, or sometimes, just writing reports).

Grant writing is much more fun! I'm teaching a graduate course on grant writing this fall as well which is very exciting--no textbook--there are none for academic grants that I've found that I've liked--so I'll be directing students to all the resources online, and helping them find grants that apply directly to their scholarly and or creative work that they can apply for, and then that will become the basis of their work for the class. We have a new Vice Provost for Research (Compliance) and Dean of Graduate Studies, and I'm excited to be working with her--she was interested to hear about the grant writing class since that's something she started at her previous university.

The other day, I got together with my linguist colleague to go over, in detail, the reader reports from the National Endowment for the Humanities on our (unfunded) Digital Humanities Grants. The reports, as is always the case with NEH, are incredibly useful, and we brainstormed a whole bunch of changes, and assigned some writing tasks.

Behind the cut are my drafts for the Abstract; Statement of Innovation; and the Significance and Contributions to the Humanities. I'm posting this small amount of text with the permission of my colleagues.

Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant Materials due Sept. 27, 2012 )